The Future Of Work: Building An Emancipatory Strategy

 

Join us this year at our participatory session at The World Transformed festival of politics and culture in Brighton!

 

Monday 25th September 17:30 (see the forthcoming World Transformed programme for venue details)

 

What to expect:

We have entered a crisis of work on a global scale: precarious working arrangements are becoming the new normal, automation technologies continue to disadvantage workers and many women still face the ‘double day’. What is to be done?

The session begins with an open discussion of the work strategy set out in Labour’s 2017 election manifesto: what does the manifesto do right? What is missing? How can we improve it so as to sufficiently confront the crisis of work? With their interventions, our panelists will seek to predict, provoke and debate with their own ideas as to where the world of work is currently heading, and where it should be heading.

 

Speakers on the panel:

 

Helen Hester (academic)

Nina Power (academic and activist)

Nick Srnicek (academic)

David Frayne (researcher)

Chaired by: Will Stronge of Autonomy

 

Speaker information:

 

Helen Hester is Associate Professor of Media and Communication at the University of West London. Her current research broadly concerns issues surrounding gender, technology and politics. Her forthcoming books include Xenofeminism (Polity: 2018) and, with Nick Srnicek, After Work: The Politics of Free Time (Verso: 2018).  She is also a member of the international feminist collective ‘Laboria Cuboniks’.

Nina Power is Senior Lecturer at Roehampton University and a founding member of ‘Defend the Right to Protest’. Her research interests include modern philosophy, policing, radical pedagogy and class. Nina writes for various magazine and news outlets including The Guardian, The Wire and Strike! In 2009 she published the influential One Dimensional Woman (Zero Books).

Nick Srnicek is Lecturer in Digital Economy at King’s College London. His current research focuses on the potential combination of post-work politics and critiques of social reproduction. He is co-author, with Alex Williams, of the influential Inventing the Future (Verso: 2015) and has also recently written on the digital economy (Platform Capitalism, Polity: 2017).

David Frayne is a writer and social researcher interested in critical social theory, the sociology of work, consumer culture, political ecology and the sociology of happiness. His first book, The Refusal of Work, was published by Zed books in 2015. His writing has also appeared in the Guardian, The Irish Times, ROAR Magazine, and Contrivers’ Review.

Labour’s 2017 election manifesto: what does the manifesto do right? What is missing? How can we improve it so as to sufficiently confront the crisis of work?